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TensorFlow: A new generation of Google's Machine Learning Open Source Library


Although Machine Learning has dominated the Artificial Intelligence scene for long, easy access to open source machine learning libraries is recently made possible. With the launch of TensorFlow, Google has made it possible for corporates to add intelligence to make sense of data.

TensorFlow adds to the list of other popular open source Machine Learning libraries like Theano and Torch. The uniqueness of TensorFlow is that it has the strong support of Google, which is one of the early pioneers in AI research. Google, using DistBelief, has delivered a lot of successful tools such as Computer Vision, Speech Recognition, Natural Language Processing, Information Extraction, Geographic Information Extraction, Computational Drug Discovery, Language Translation, etc. Tensorflow is Google's second generation machine learning system. 

Teaching machines was never so easy. TensorFlow lets you use most of the machine learning algorithms that Google employees use to add intelligence to their products.

To learn more about TensorFlow check TensorFlow's official website at TensorFlow. 

With the world heading towards making machines more intelligent, we at CereLabs are closely monitoring how our research and engineering teams can benefit from the unlimited set of Machine Learning open source libraries.

As we proceed to take this journey, we will keep adding our experience of TensorFlow. Keep looking at this blog for future updates.

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